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Polish Lowland Sheepdog - pons - pon the dog

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exquisite Wonder Othomas.

Breeder: Gerda Steekers, Netherlands, Owner: Mrs. Han Langemeijer

 

 

 

Hiking with your PON

 

 




 

 

PONS with their keen sense of hearing and smell, can make wonderful hiking companions for families willing to take the proper precautions. Consult with your vet about important vaccinations and request a basic health checkup before making a final decision about bringing your PON along on a hiking trip.

Vaccinations need to include rabies, flea and tick control and inquiries about Lyme and Rocky Mountain spotted fever, depending on your area of the country.

Once your vet has cleared your PON's health, and made sure vaccinations are updated, you can start a training regimen if your PON is not used to regular strenuous exercise. Owners can start with longer walks around the neighborhood and increase distances so that both PON and owners become conditioned to increased daily exercise.

Be sure to have copies of your PON's vaccinations in case of emergency visits to a local vet. Your vet may also suggest a canine first aid kit as well. Learn basic first aid techniques which may save your PON's life. First Aid kits should include basic supplies such as alcohol wipes, antibiotic cream and bandages. Wise owners will also wish to have their family vet's phone number on hand for consultations.

All PONS need to be checked for ticks at the end of all hikes. Be sure to have a spoon-shaped tick remover available at all times.

Clean drinking water is essential for your PONS and you should avoid having your PON drink from streams or ponds on the trail, which may contain giardia and other dangerous bacteria. Consider bringing a good supply of bottled water and a collapsible water bowl.

 Owners need to be informed of local laws when hiking with their PONS. Most hiking areas have regulations regarding dogs on leashes. If this is not required in your area, PON owners should seriously consider leashing PONS to prevent them from running after wildlife  and injuring themselves. A longer leash of about 15 feet will offer your PON more room to explore his environment. Be very sure that your PON has all of his identification information, including your name and phone number in case he becomes lost.

Last, but not least, responsible PON owners need to carry plastic bags to pick up after their PONS in the wild. Following posted regulations and keeping your PON under control will allow owners to enjoy relaxing autumn hikes.

 

 

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