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PON von Regensdorf

 

PON von Regensdorf

 

Swancrest PONS

 

Swancrest PONS

 

 

 

Introducing a New PON to your home

 

Introducing a new PON to your home is exciting and both furry and human relatives look forward to your new PON. Most important  for the new PON is his/her introduction to the members of the household, especially the resident PONS.  PONS usually enjoy having a companion with whom to share their family and treat newcomers with lots of love and understanding. From day one, Pocahontas treated Mona Lisa as though she were her own puppy and was extremely tender with her. Both girls eagerly welcomed Shakey and enjoyed countless play sessions with him. Honestly, I never experienced relationship problems amongst the three of them.

Avoid moving your PON'S crate or toys to make room for the newcomer and don't feed the PONS too closely to each other. Make sure that you offer food exactly at the same time. Keep an eye on each of them during meal times and let them know that individual rights are protected. Whenever you are away from home, your PONS should be separated. Your new PON should have a crate even if your resident PON does not. Each PON should have separate time to play and build a relationship with you as his leader as well as time to share you. I have always walked each PON separately and feel this has made a big difference.

If other members of your family are paying special attention to your new PON, be sensitive to both PONS' behavior at these times. The best way to handle any tension or aggression between the PONS is to distract them by opening the door to a fenced yard or by calling them to another room. Be sure not to appear to give your PON a reward for poor behavior toward the newcomer by allowing them to play outside every time they appear to fight--but unrelated distractions from the PONS point of view, may work wonders

The ages of the resident PONS may make a difference in accepting newcomers and younger resident PONS tend be more flexible, but this does not mean that older PONS won't accept newcomers. Families need to make resident PONS feel secure in their position of alpha dog.

 

 

 

 

 

 
"The poor dog, in life the the firmest friend,
The first to welcome, foremost to defend,
Whose honest heart is still the master's own,
Who labours, fights, lives, breathes for him alone,
Unhonour'd falls, unnoticed all his worth,
Denied in heaven the soul he held on earth,
While man, vain insect hopes to be forgiven,
And claims himself a sole exclusive heaven."
 
Lord Byron
Inscription on the monument of his
Newfoundland dog, 1808

 

 

 

 

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